This is a prototype dashboard created by TAP for Data at Cornell University.


Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §300.600 requires each state to make determinations annually about the performance of each public school district based on its annual performance relating to State Performance Plan (SPP) indicators. These determinations must be made in consideration of information obtained through monitoring visits, other public information made available, including any audit findings, and whether the data submitted by the district is valid, reliable, and timely.

See IDEA section of the Documentation tab for more information.


Special Education State Performance Plan (SPP) / Annual Performance Report (APR)

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) requires each state to have in place a State Performance Plan (SPP) that evaluates its efforts to implement the requirements and purposes of Part B of IDEA and describes how the state will improve such implementation. The SPP provides the baseline data, measurable and rigorous targets, improvement activities, timelines and resources established by the State for each indicator.

States must report annually on their performance in the targets identified in the SPP through an Annual Performance Report (APR). The SPP/APR reflects the state's progress toward meeting its Part B goals and provides the actual target data, explanation of progress or slippage and discussion of improvement activities completed by the state for Indicators 1-16.

SPP Indicators 1, 2, 4 are based on the 2016-17 academic year data, the remaining Indicators are based on the 2017-18 academic year data.

For more information see: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/spp/


Special Education State Performance Plan (SPP) / Annual Performance Report (APR)

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) requires each state to have in place a State Performance Plan (SPP) that evaluates its efforts to implement the requirements and purposes of Part B of IDEA and describes how the state will improve such implementation. The SPP provides the baseline data, measurable and rigorous targets, improvement activities, timelines and resources established by the State for each indicator.

States must report annually on their performance in the targets identified in the SPP through an Annual Performance Report (APR). The SPP/APR reflects the state's progress toward meeting its Part B goals and provides the actual target data, explanation of progress or slippage and discussion of improvement activities completed by the state for Indicators 1-16.

SPP Indicators 1, 2, 4 are based on the previous academic year data, the remaining Indicators are based on the academic year data as specified in the column header.

For more information see: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/spp/



SPP Data Submission Schedule


ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) requires states and Local Educational Agencies (i.e., school districts and charter schools) to take a variety of actions to ensure that all children, regardless of race, socioeconomic status, gender, disability status, primary language, or ZIP code, receive the education that they need to be prepared for success in postsecondary education, careers, and citizenship.



Accountability Status by School



Accountability Legend


A cohort is a group of students who first entered Grade 9 in the same school year. See the SIRS Manual for a more complete definition. http://www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/sirs/home.html

Graduates include students who received a Local Diploma or a Local Diploma with Regents endorsement (Regents Diploma). All students who received a Regents Diploma (with or without Advanced Designation or CTE Endorsement) are included in the number of students with Regents Diploma. A student’s outcome is based on their last regular enrollment as of June or August of the reported school year.

Definition of Drop Out: A student who leaves during the school year without documentation of a transfer to another program leading to a high school diploma or to an approved high school equivalency program or to a high school equivalency preparation program is counted as a dropout unless the student resumes school attendance before the end of the school year.

New York School Info Dashboard

Please contact your Data Associate or email tapdata@cornell.edu with questions or feedback on this site.

Please note that this is a prototype and may change or not be available in the future. Use at your own risk.

Data Sources:

Data last updated: August 27, 2020 16:03:30

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

New York State Education Department 2019 Criteria for School District Determinations under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §300.600 requires each state to make determinations annually about the performance of each public school district based on its annual performance relating to State Performance Plan (SPP) indicators. These determinations must be made in consideration of information obtained through monitoring visits, other public information made available, including any audit findings, and whether the data submitted by the district is valid, reliable, and timely.

States must consider compliance and may consider other performance indicators in relation to the state’s targets for improvement for these indicators. Based upon this information, the state must determine whether the district meets the requirements and purposes of IDEA, needs assistance in implementing the requirements of IDEA, needs intervention in implementing the requirements of IDEA, or needs substantial intervention in implementing the requirements of IDEA (34 CFR §300.603). New York State makes its annual IDEA determinations based on consideration of both a district’s performance outcomes and compliance status.

DeterminationCriteria
Needs Assistance

Performance: District is a Target District under the Every Students Succeeds Act (ESSA) based on performance of students with disabilities.

Compliance: District has findings of noncompliance that remain uncorrected between 12 and 24 months from the date of identification of the noncompliance by NYSED.

Needs Intervention

Performance: District is a Target District under ESSA based on performance of students with disabilities for more than five consecutive years.

Compliance: District has findings of noncompliance that remain uncorrected for more than 24 months from the date of identification of the noncompliance by NYSED.

Other: The district has been identified by the State as a Needs Assistance or Needs Intervention district under IDEA for more than five consecutive years.

Needs Substantial Intervention

Compliance: District has significant noncompliance that remains uncorrected and is resulting in substantial failure of the district to provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE) for its students with disabilities.

Any school district that has been determined to be a district needing assistance, intervention or substantial intervention for not meeting the requirements of Part B of IDEA, including the targets in the State Performance Plan, is prohibited from reducing its maintenance of effort under 34 CFR §300.203 for any fiscal year in which it is identified [34 CFR §300.608]

Source: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/spp/nysdeterminations/documents/determination-criteria-2019.pdf

SPP Indicators

Special Education State Performance Plan (SPP) / Annual Performance Report (APR)

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) requires each state to have in place a State Performance Plan (SPP) that evaluates its efforts to implement the requirements and purposes of Part B of IDEA and describes how the state will improve such implementation. The SPP provides the baseline data, measurable and rigorous targets, improvement activities, timelines and resources established by the State for each indicator.

States must report annually on their performance in the targets identified in the SPP through an Annual Performance Report (APR). The SPP/APR reflects the state's progress toward meeting its Part B goals and provides the actual target data, explanation of progress or slippage and discussion of improvement activities completed by the state for Indicators 1-16.

SPP Indicators 1, 2, 4 are based on the 2016-17 academic year data, the remaining Indicators are based on the 2017-18 academic year data.

For more information see: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/spp/

Indicator Definitions

  • Indicator 1 - Percent of youth with IEP graduating from high school with a regular diploma compared to percent of all youth in the State graduating with a regular diploma.
  • Indicator 2 - Percent of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school.
  • Indicator 3 - Participation and performance of children with individualized education programs (IEPs) on statewide assessments
    • Indicator 3B - Participation rate for children with IEPs
    • Indicator 3C - Proficiency rate for children with IEPs against grade level and alternate academic achievement standards
  • Indicator 4 - Rates of suspension and expulsion
    • Indicator 4A - Percent of districts that have a significant discrepancy in the rate of suspensions and expulsions of greater than 10 days in a school year for children with IEPs
    • Indicator 4B - Percent of districts that have: (a) a significant discrepancy, by race or ethnicity, in the rate of suspensions and expulsions of greater than 10 days in a school year for children with IEPs; and (b) policies, procedures or practices that contribute to the significant discrepancy and do not comply with requirements relating to the development and implementation of IEPs, the use of positive behavioral interventions and supports, and procedural safeguards
  • Indicator 5 - Percent of children with individualized education programs (IEPs) aged 6 through 21 served in different settings
    • Indicator 5A - Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day
    • Indicator 5B - Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day
    • Indicator 5C - Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements
  • Indicator 6 - Percent of children with individualized education programs (IEPs) aged 3 to 5 attending a regular early childhood program and receiving the majority of special education and related services in the regular early childhood program
    • Indicator 6A - Percent of children with IEPs aged 3 through 5 attending a regular early childhood program and receiving the majority of special education and related services in the regular early childhood program
    • Indicator 6B - Percent of children with IEPs aged 3 through 5 attending a separate special education class, separate school or residential facility
  • Indicator 7 - “Percent of preschool children aged 3 through 5 with individualized education programs (IEPs) who demonstrate improved: A. Positive social-emotional skills (including social relationships); B. Acquisition and use of knowledge and skills (including early language/ communication and early literacy); and C. Use of appropriate behaviors to meet their needs. Use of appropriate behaviors to meet their needs.”
  • Indicator 8 - Percent of parents with a child receiving special education services who report that schools facilitated parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for children with disabilities.
  • Indicator 9 - Percent of districts with disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic groups in special education and related services that is the result of inappropriate identification
  • Indicator 10 - Percent of districts with disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic groups in specific disability categories that is the result of inappropriate identification
  • Indicator 11 - Percent of children who were evaluated within 60 days of receiving parental consent for initial evaluation or, if the State establishes a timeframe within which the evaluation must be conducted, within that timeframe
  • Indicator 12 - Percent of children referred by Part C prior to age 3, who are found eligible for Part B, and who have an IEP developed and implemented by their third birthdays
  • Indicator 13 - Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals that are annually updated and based upon an age appropriate transition assessment, transition services, including courses of study, that will reasonably enable the student to meet those postsecondary goals, and annual IEP goals related to the student’s transition services needs. There also must be evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services are to be discussed and evidence that, if appropriate, a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority.
  • Indicator 14 - “Percent of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were: A. Enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school. B. Enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school. C. Enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school.”

These are the State Performance Plan indicator targets for the past few years. See the Grads360 website for more information.

What is ESSA?

ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) requires states and Local Educational Agencies (i.e., school districts and charter schools) to take a variety of actions to ensure that all children, regardless of race, socioeconomic status, gender, disability status, primary language, or ZIP code, receive the education that they need to be prepared for success in postsecondary education, careers, and citizenship.

What is NYS’s ESSA Plan?

New York State receives approximately $1.6 billion annually in funding through ESSA. Every state that receives ESSA funding is required to submit a plan to the U.S. Department of Education delineating the state’s educational goals and how progress will be measured. NYS’s ESSA plan outlining its approach to ESSA planning and goals, and the accountability system was approved in 2018.

NYS ESSA Plan Summary: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/essa/nys-essa-plan-summary.pdf

NYS ESSA Goals: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/essa/essa-fact-sheet-educators.pdf

  1. New York State values a well-rounded education for all. The plan is that schools and districts will be measured annually on these indicators:

    • All schools
    • ELA, Math, Science, Process in learning English as an additional language, Chronic absenteeism (absent 10% or more instructional days)
    • High school
    • Social studies
    • Graduation rate
    • College, career, and civic readiness
  2. New York State wants to reduce testing time and improve the testing experience. The plans to achieve the goal are that:

    • State tests in grades 3-8 English and math will be reduced to from three days to two days each.
    • The law requires that 95% of students in each tested subgroup take the appropriate state tests. New York State will work with parents, schools, and districts to increase participation.
    • New York State will continue to translate state math and science tests into more languages, and when funding becomes available, will create language arts tests in students’ native languages

Accountability: Performance Indicators

The NYS’s ESSA plan includes a new set of indicators to measure school performance. Note that, the performance indicators are measured slightly different between elementary-middle level schools and high schools.

Elementary-middle level schools will be held accountable for five indicators:

  • Composite Performance (i.e., academic achievement in English language arts, math, and science)
  • Student Growth in English language arts and mathematics
  • Progress of English language learners towards English Language Proficiency
  • Academic Progress in English language arts and mathematics
  • Chronic Absenteeism

High schools will be held accountable for six indicators:

  • Composite Performance (i.e., academic achievement in English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies)
  • Graduation Rate (4-, 5-, and 6-year cohorts)
  • Progress of English language learners towards English Language Proficiency
  • Academic Progress in English language arts and mathematics
  • Chronic Absenteeism
  • College, Career and Civic Readiness (CCCR)

A brief description of the indicators is given below:

  • Composite Performance - Measures achievement on state assessments in English language arts (ELA), mathematics, and science. For high schools, also measures achievement on state assessments in social studies.

  • Student Growth - Measures student growth on statewide assessments in ELA and mathematics for students in grades 4-8, by comparing the scores of students in the current year to the scores of students with similar scores in prior year(s).

  • Academic Progress - Measures progress on state assessments in ELA and in mathematics against long-term goals and Measures of Interim Progress (MIP).

  • Graduation Rates - Measures 4-, 5-, and 6-year cohort graduation rates against long-term goals and MIPs.

  • English Language Proficiency - Measures the progress of English Language Learners (ELL) in meeting their individual goals on the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT).

  • Chronic Absenteeism - Measures the percentage of students who miss 10% or more days of instruction against long-term goals and MIPs.

  • College, Career and Civic Readiness (CCCR) - Measures the percentage of students who are leaving school prepared for college, career and civic readiness as measured by diplomas, credentials, advanced course credits and enrollment, career and technical education certifications, and other similar indicators against long-term goals and MIPs.

Accountability: ESSA Status

Under ESSA, the New York State accountability system assigned a Level from 1 to 4 to each accountability subgroup for each measure at each school based on the subgroups’ performance on the measures, where 1 indicates the lowest performance and 4 indicates the highest performance. These Levels are then used to determine the school’s ESSA Status: if a school is a School in Good Standing, a Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI) School, or a Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) School.

An accountability subgroup is a group of students who are assigned to a certain category based on their race/ethnicity, English language proficiency, disability status, or economic status. The accountability subgroups are: All Students, American Indian or Alaska Native, Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, Asian or Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, White, Multiracial, English Language Learner (ELL), Students with Disabilities, and Economically Disadvantaged.

Each student is included in the All Students group as well as one of the racial/ethnic sub-groups.

In addition, certain students will also be classified as an English language learner; a student with a disability; and/or an economically disadvantaged student.

Level 1 to 4 Determination

For every indicator, a school is given a numeric score:

  • A score of “1” to “4” is given for all students at a school and
  • A score of “1” to “4” is given for each specific student subgroup at a school for which the school is accountable
    • “1” is lowest
    • “4” is highest
  • This indicator measures achievement on state assessments in English language arts (ELA), math, and science.
  • Levels are assigned based on where a school ranks compared to all other schools in the state:
Rank Level
10% or Less 1
10.1 to 50% 2
50.1 to 75% 3
Greater than 75% 4
  • Schools receive no credit for students who score at Level 1, partial credit for students who score at Level 2, full credit for students who score at Level 3, and extra credit for students who score at Level 4.
  • The Composite Performance Index is computed two ways: one based on only students who participated in state assessments and one adjusted for students who did not participate.
  • A school can receive an index that ranges from 0 to 250.
  • Empire Elementary School had a Performance Index of 91 out of a possible 250 based on students who participated in the state assessments and 88 when adjusted for students who did not participate.
  • Empire Elementary School received a Level 2 on this indicator, meaning our school performed between the 10% and 50% percentile among all elementary and middle schools in the state.

ESSA Status Determination

The accountability system classifies schools as either In Good Standing, a Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) school, or a Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI) school. Both CSI and TSI schools are eligible for additional support.

Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) schools are (Different determination criteria in different documents!)

Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI) schools are

Source: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/accountability/essa/documents/ESSAGeneralMemo101918.pdf

Graduation Rate Data Glossary of Terms

This information comes from the data dictionary included in the data download.*

Cohort - A group of students who first entered Grade 9 in the same school year. See the SIRS Manual for a more complete definition. http://www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/sirs/home.html

Dropouts - Students in grades 7 -12 and ungraded secondary students whose last regular enrollment record indicated they dropped out of school.

Economically Disadvantaged - Economically disadvantaged students are those who participate in, or whose family participates in, economic assistance programs, such as the free or reduced-price lunch programs, Social Security Insurance (SSI), Food Stamps, Foster Care, Refugee Assistance (cash or medical assistance), Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP), Safety Net Assistance (SNA), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), or Family Assistance: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). If one student in a family is identified as low income, all students from that household (economic unit) may be identified as low income.

English Language Learner (ELL) - English Language Learners are those students who, by reason of foreign birth or ancestry, speak or understand a language other than English and speak or understand little or no English, and require support in order to become proficient in English and are identified pursuant to Section 154.3 of Commissioner’s Regulations. These students were previously referred to as Limited English Proficient (LEP).

Ever English Language Learner (ELL) - A student who was identified as an English Language Learner in any school year, including the reported school year.

Former English Language Learner (ELL) - A student who was identified as an English Language Learner in any of the four years prior to the reported school year and who was exited from the status because they demonstrated proficiency in English.

GED (HSE) Transfer - Students whose last enrollment record indicated they transferred to an Approved Alternative High School Equivalency Program.

Gender - Gender of the student being reported, as identified by the student. In the case of very young transgender students not yet able to advocate for themselves, gender may be identified by the parent or guardian.

Graduates - Graduates include students who received a Local Diploma or a Local Diploma with Regents endorsement (Regents Diploma). All students who received a Regents Diploma (with or without Advanced Designation or CTE Endorsement) are included in the number of students with Regents Diploma. A student’s outcome is based on their last regular enrollment as of June 30th of the reported school year.

Homeless - Student who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, including a student who is sharing the housing of other persons due to a loss of housing, economic hardship, or similar reason; living in motels, hotels, trailer parks or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations; abandoned in hospitals; or a migratory child, as defined in subsection 2 of section 1309 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, who qualifies as homeless under any of the above provisions; or has a primary nighttime location that is a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations including, but not limited to, shelters operated or approved by the State or local department of social services, and residential programs for runaway and homeless youth established pursuant to article 19H of the executive law or a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings, including a car, park, public space, abandoned building, substandard housing, bus, train stations, or similar setting. Homeless students do not include children in foster care placements or who are receiving educational services pursuant to subdivision four, five, six, six-a, or seven of Education Law section 3202 or pursuant to article 81, 85, 87, or 88 of Education Law.

In Foster Care - Student who is in 24-hour substitute care for children placed away from their parents and for whom the agency under title IV-E of the Social Security Act has placement and care responsibility. This includes, but is not limited to, placements in foster family homes, foster homes of relatives, group homes, emergency shelters, residential facilities, childcare institutions, and pre-adoptive homes. A child is in foster care in accordance with this definition regardless of whether or not the foster care facility is licensed and payments are made by the State, tribal, or local agency for the care of the child, whether adoption subsidy payments are being made prior to the finalization of an adoption, or whether there is federal matching of any payments that are made.

Local Diploma - Can only be obtained by students with disabilities with an individualized education program or Section 504 Accommodation Plan. For complete information on the requirements for this diploma see Diploma Requirements.

Migrant - A student is a migrant child if the student is, or whose parent, guardian, or spouse is, a migratory agricultural worker, including a migratory dairy worker or a migratory fisher, and who, in the preceding 36 months, in order to obtain, or accompany such parent, guardian, or spouse, in order to obtain, temporary or seasonal employment in agricultural or fishing work has moved from one school district to another.

Non-Diploma Credentials - This commencement option includes stand-alone Career Development and Occupational Studies (CDOS) and Skills and Achievement credentials. These students are considered completers, but not graduates.

One-Time English Language Learner (ELL) - A student who was identified as an English Language Learner in any school year prior to, but not including, the reported school year.

Parent in Armed Forces - Student with one or more parent or guardian who is a member of the Armed Forces and on Active Duty. The Armed Forces are the Army, Navy, Air Force, 5 Marine Corps, the Coast Guard, or full-time National Guard. Active duty means full-time duty in the active military service of the United States. Such term includes full-time training duty, annual training duty, and attendance, while in the active military service, at a school designated as a service school by law or by the Secretary of the military department concerned.

Race/Ethnicity - Race or races with which the student primarily identifies as indicated by the student or the parent/guardian.

  • American Indian or Alaska Native: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent, including Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American: A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.
  • Hispanic or Latino: A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.
  • Multiracial: Non-Hispanic students who are reported with more than one race category
  • Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East.

Regents Diploma - Requires a student pass a minimum of five (5) Regents examinations in addition to meeting course and credit requirements. For complete information on the requirements for this diploma see Diploma Requirements.

Regents with Advanced Designation - Requires a student pass a minimum of eight (8) Regents examinations in addition to meeting course and credit requirements. For complete information on the requirements for this diploma see Diploma Requirements.

Still Enrolled - Students whose last regular enrollment record for the reported school year indicated they were still enrolled in high school.